Steel Pulse – “Put Your Hoodies On [4 Trayvon]” (3rd Anniversary Edition) (Official HD Music Video 2015)

I was still in Amerikkka when the innocent 17 year old Trayvon Martin was shot down.  I had attended a candle lit vigil in his memory at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, where the violin was played and certain professors made speeches about injustice and racism.  The moving speeches aimed to remind us that brutal incidents such as this are not a new phenomenon (remember Amadou Diallo?) but neither a thing of the past.  Indeed, police brutality has been in the forefront these last couple of years all over the world. I take this opportunity to send my prayer for the end of unjust human suffering that plagues the earth today.  Big up David Hinds and Steel Pulse for paying a tribute to Travyon and spreading the positive message of unity and equality against injustice…

“Steel Pulse originally released this track and music video on the second anniversary of the death of Trayvon Martin, which occurred on February 26, 2012, in Sanford, FL. This is an updated version released to mark the third anniversary of his slaying. Gone, but not forgotten.

This song marks the first official contribution to a Steel Pulse studio track by Baruch Hinds, son of Steel Pulse lead singer David Hinds. Shot on location at the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington D.C., and in Sanford, Florida.”

Directed by Yonathan Gal // Cinematographer: Trishul Thejasvi // Editor: Rory Gordon // 1st AC: Raul Rivero // Camera Assistants: David Revenkov & Brandon Gordon

http://steelpulse.com/
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Steel-
http://www.myspace.com/officialsteelp
http://twitter.com/#!/steelpulse
http://www.driftwoodpictures.net

Advertisements

“Hands Up I Can’t Breathe” – Steel Pulse (New Single December 2014) Listen & read full lyrics!

Brand new tune by the legendary reggae band Steel Pulse and David Hinds, livicated to the lives that have been recently unjustly taken by police brutality and racist discrimination, in particular the shooting of 18 year old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, this past August. Once again and after all their years of making music, Steel Pulse always deliver a notably strong and relevant message. Still chanting down Babylon as 2015 approaches… Listen and read / share the full lyrics below!

Lyrics (transcribed by rootsnwingz):

Should I run away

Don’t get disillusioned
By this racist institution
The bigots are out there with their weapons too
Yes they’re aiming just to gun down our children

So let me tell you this time around
Yes, we’re gonna draw this line right now
Our common goal is to stand our grounds
You got the city on lock down

Don’t shoot, I got my hands up
Don’t shoot, I put my hands up
Shoot I to keep my mouth shut
What do you want from me?

Don’t shoot, I got my hands up
Don’t shoot, I put my hands up
No doubt, you got the handcuffs
I’m choking, I can’t breathe

Why should I run away? Curfew!

Do I lay dead as a victim
Another statistics to the system
All kinds of crazy shit flow through my mind
Do I left to raise my children
So I’m gonna tell you this time around
What goes around, yes will come around
Is it defiance that has me bound
You got this whole town on lock down

Don’t shoot, I got my hands up
Don’t shoot, I put my hands up
Shoot I to keep my mouth shut
What do you want from me?

Don’t shoot, I got my hands up
Don’t shoot, I put my hands up
No doubt, you got the handcuffs
I’m choking I can’t breathe

I’m down on my bended knees
I’m choking I cannot breathe
I beg you don’t tazer me

Why should I run away?

Is it because I’m happy?
Why you so trigger happy?

Don’t shoot!

police brutalityUndercover cop pulls pistol on unarmed civilians in Oakland, California.

1845 – Frederick Douglass in Ireland

frederick_douglass_mural_on_the_solidarity_wall_belfast

Tribute to Frederick Douglass on the Solidarity Wall in Belfast , who escaped slavery in 1838 and visited Ireland for a 4 month lecture tour in order to present his autobiography “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave”.

“Perhaps no class has carried this prejudice against colour to a point more extreme and dangerous than have the Irish and yet no people have been more relentlessly persecuted and oppressed on account of race and religion” – Frederick Douglass.

Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

In 1845, as Ireland was descending into the despair of the Great Hunger, Frederick Douglass arrived for a four-month lecture tour of the island. Douglass had escaped slavery in Maryland seven years earlier, and had recently published his autobiography Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave. Douglass was greeted in Dublin, Belfast, and Cork by enthusiastic crowds and formed many friendships on his trip, most significantly with Daniel O’Connell, a figure still revered in Ireland today for his role in Catholic emancipation and his fierce opposition to slavery. O’Connell and Douglass shared the stage just once, in September 1845 at a rally in Dublin, but retained a mutual respect and affection until O’Connell’s death less than two years later – and Douglass acknowledged O’Connell’s influence on his philosophy and worldview for the rest of his life.

Belfast media published an article on a speech given by abolitionist…

View original post 128 more words

Mutiny Aboard the Slave Ships in the 18th century: Implications for the Transatlantic Slave Trade

Original Research Paper written by rootsnwingz 3 years ago on the historical significance of mutiny during the slave trade.  Many thanks to my professor, classmates and the librarians who helped me with my research. 


Mutiny Aboard the Slave Ships in the 18th century: 
Implications for the Transatlantic Slave Trade

mutinyMural painted by Hale Woodruff.

“The trade of slaves is in a more peculiar manner the business of kings, rich men, and prime merchants, exclusive of the inferior sort of Blacks.”
– John Barbot, European Slave Trader (1682)

The present research paper primarily deals with the phenomenon of resistance onboard ships by Africans against their enslavement during what is commonly referred to as the “Middle Passage”, i.e. the voyage across the Atlantic from the West Coast of Africa to the Americas. Insurrections of this kind flourished in the 17th and 18th centuries and had an undeniable impact on numerous aspects of the slave trade, including the slave traders themselves, who were forced to adapt to these new conditions of the transatlantic slave trade.

Therefore, I will make use of primary accounts of mutiny aboard the slave ships from the 18th century with the hopes of gaining a better understanding of its impact on the slave trade. In short, I intend to argue that the slave traders generally considered mutiny as merely a financial setback and thus the adoption of measures to prevent or restrain insurrections became a priority for the management and organization of slave ships. The ultimate point this paper hopes to make is that mutiny had a real effect on the slave trade, in the sense that it made the business of trading slaves more costly and risky for the European traders, which consequently reduced shipments to the New World. Continue reading

40 Must-See Historic Pictures (Taken from www.demilked.com)

They say a picture is worth 1000 words. Indeed the gallery below depicts certain historical moments, capturing their essence accurately and effectively. Each high quality photograph tells its own story about people, places and events that changed the course of history. A must-see for all photography and history enthusiasts…

Hotel owner pouring acid in the pool while black people swim in it, ca. 1964

Illegal alcohol being poured out during Prohibition, Detroit, 1929

Woman With A Gas-Resistant Pram, England, 1938


(37 more photographs) Continue reading

“When Britain Loved Rastafari”, by Ras Cos Tafari, Sister Stella Headley, Ras Shango Baku, Dr Robbie Shilliam, Ras Rai I and Sister Addishiwot Asfawosen

Insightful essay on RasTafari, taken from http://www.discoversociety.org, July 2014, Focus Issue 10.

What does the British public know about RasTafari? Perhaps they might recognise the colours – red, gold and green – although they might mistake them for the Jamaican flag instead of the royal Ethiopian standard. The word “stoned” might come to mind, implying the use of a “drug” called Marijuana, which to members of the faith is a holy herb and used as part of a sacramental rite. No doubt they would be able to sing a line from Bob Marley’s “Three Little Birds”, while probably being less familiar with the singer’s more political Pan-African oriented songs such as “Africa Unite”.

Older members of the public might also think of the iconic cover of The Clash’s Black Market Clash, where a lone “dread” (Don Letts) confronts a line of police. In this respect, they would be referencing a time before the current Muslim scare when young Black men with dreadlocks occupied the position of public enemy number one as muggers, drug dealers, fanatics and rioters.

clash album cover
It would not be unfair to say that in Britain RasTafari has largely been apprehended as either a colourful curiosity or a corrosive cult. Yet it is neither of these. At its root, RasTafari is a movement of Pan-African redemption, confronting the inequities forged in the days of slavery and colonialism that continue to reverberate across physical, mental and spiritual dimensions. RasTafari take their name from the title that the Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie I held as crown prince. Ras is a rank, meaning “head”; Tafari can be glossed from the Amharic as “a person who inspires awe”.

As a movement, RasTafari finds its compass and energy store in a faith (some would call it a “livity”) that centres upon the divine nature of Selassie I and his consort, Empress Menen – the Ethiopian Alpha and Omega. Many observers of the RasTafari movement are captivated by its aesthetics and music. Some will sympathise with the RasTafari ethos. Most, though, will be confused by the overwhelming love demonstrated for Selassie I, which they will interpret as evidence of fanaticism, cultism or the result of harmless recreational smoke.

In fact, RasTafari carefully utilise diverse and complex theological and cosmological traditions to “sight up” the nature of Selassie I’s divinity, expertly weaving together Biblical prophesies, doctrines of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, and indigenous cosmologies that arrived with those Africans trafficked illegally across the oceans to work as chattel on plantations.

Hence, for RasTafari, the fundamental challenges posed to humanity in the twentieth century and beyond are manifested in the life, experiences and utterances of Selassie I with Empress Menen. But you do not have to rely on our testimony alone. For there was a time when even the British public loved RasTafari. Step back into this history with us, because we want you to know us better.

Rally around the Red, Gold and Green

It is July 1935 and Mussolini has amassed Italian troops on the frontiers of Ethiopia. After manufacturing a border “incident” the previous year, Mussolini wants to reverse the historic defeat suffered by Italy from the armies of Ethiopian emperor Menelik II at Adwa in 1896. Like all reputable European imperialists, he is determined to stake out his own place in the sun – the horn of Africa. And he has already taken Eritrea and Italian Somaliland.

Click here to continue reading.