“Unemployment” – Twinkle Brothers, with full lyrics by rootsnwingz

One of my most beloved Jamaican UK produced roots reggae pieces, the deeply meaningful “Unemployment”, remains as relevant as it was upon its release in 1984.  I could not find the lyrics anywhere, so I transcribed them myself.  The lyrics are an original rootsnwingz online exclusive, you won’t find them anywhere else on the web! Watch this insightful and cleverly made unofficial video and read and share the full lyrics below.

Full lyrics by rootsnwingz:

“Unemployment” – Twinkle Brothers
Album: Burden Bearer (1984)

(Scatting)

Time hard sir
But it gettin harder
Devaluation of the dollar make cost a living get higher

Today you live like a king sir
Tomorrow you beg like a pauper (x2)

Time hard sir
A so it rough sir
5 out of 10 nah work sir
Talkin about unemployment sir

Today you drink wine like a water
Mind tomorrow you drink but a wata
Today you drink wine like a water
Tomorrow you drink but a wata

Time hard sir
A so it rough sir
Devaluation of the dollar make prices get higher
Let me tell you time hard sir
A so it rough sir

Today you live like a king sir
Tomorrow you beg like a pauper (x2)

Time hard sir
A so it rough sir
5 out of 10 nah work sir
Talkin about unemployment sir
Time hard sir
A so it rough sir

Today you drink wine like water
Mind tomorrow you drink but a wata
Today you drink wine like water
Tomorrow you drink but a wata

Time hard sir
A so it rough sir
Devaluation of the dollar, prices get higher

Time hard sir
But it gettin harder
Tell you time rough sir
Talking about unemployment sir

Time hard sir
I say time rough sir
Devaluation of the dollar make prices get higher

Me tell you time rough sir
A so it tough sir
5 out of 10 nah work sir
Talkin about unemployment sir
Me tell you time hard sir

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‘Are women treated “egalitarianly” in egalitarian societies?’, an original essay by rootsnwingz

nisa

Members of an egalitarian society are, by definition, considered to be equals, i.e. they have the same status despite their diversity in terms of race, social class, income, or in this case, gender. Therefore, in principle, women in egalitarian societies have an equally important social role and responsibility as men do, or there is a general semblance of equality. In an egalitarian society, both men and women have equal influence and thus have equal opportunity to assume positions of authority. Nevertheless, although hunter-gatherer societies were more egalitarian than today’s segregated socioeconomic cultures, one may still observe differences between men and women’s roles, and even some degree of inequity.

The experiences of women in egalitarian foraging societies as described by Marjorie Shostak in her book, “Nisa, the life and words of a !Kung woman”, testify to a higher degree of gender equality in bushman societies than in non-egalitarian modern ones. However, they also shed some light into why men still managed to assume greater authority in some instances and why their contribution was often valued more than women’s. In spite of these slight gender differences, the author argues that foraging societies were a lot less stratified than today’s market-based societies, where gender hierarchies are prevalent. In other words, she suggests that:

Perhaps the extremes of subordination of women by men found in many of today’s more socioeconomically ‘advanced’ cultures are only a relatively recent aberration in our long, human calendar.” (Shostak 2000, 214)

In my view, the emergence of gender hierarchies is directly related to the shift from hunting and gathering towards a settler’s life and the development of market economies. Continue reading