The Cluster Planet aka OmNebula Presents “The Forest Of Dub”, this Saturday, April 18th at 11:00pm – 7:00am @ IT The Place, Athens, Greece

forestofdub

Very pleased to have been invited to perform at yet another OmNebula event in Athens alongside my brothers, there exist angles, Bluez and of course OmNebula.  Taking place this Saturday at IT The Place, Exarcheia, Athens, the session is not to be missed by any reggae and dub lover in Greece.  Strictly good vibes guaranteed!

https://www.facebook.com/events/530784833727665/

Line Up

OmNebula ( Twisted Frequencies)
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/dj-omnebula
Soundcloud : https://soundcloud.com/twisted-frequencies-promos

Bluez (Indigo Movement)
Soundcloud : https://soundcloud.com/bluezsounds
Soundcloud : https://soundcloud.com/indigo-movement

there exist angles
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/there-exist-angles

roots n wingz
https://rootsnwingz.com/
https://www.mixcloud.com/rootsnwingz/

REGGAE // DUB // PSYDUB

Entrance:: €3

IT The Place, Kleisovis 10, 10677 Athens, Greece

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“The Modern Greek Enlightenment and Revolution” – An original history research paper by rootsnwingz

Historical Background

On the 29th of May 1453, the capital of the Byzantine Empire, Constantinople, was conquered after a long siege by the Ottoman armed forces, led by the twenty-one-year-old Fatih Sultan Mehmed II. The siege of Constantinople by the Ottomans signified the fall of Byzantium and the end an era, that is its millennium-long reign in the Mediterranean region. In addition, it meant that most of the geographical area that is today known as Greece, fell under Turkish rule.   The Ottoman occupation of Greece lasted for the following four hundred years, a period commonly referred to as Tourkokratia (Τουρκοκρατία) (Cogg C 1992, 3). The Tourkokratia is usually considered an oppressive time, mainly due to the imposition of religious restrictions, heavy, unjust taxation and the practice of Paidomazoma (Παιδομάζωμα) or Janissary levy, which translates from Greek as the gathering of children. This practice refers to the enforced obligation of each and every Christian family to surrender their best looking and most intelligent children to be raised as Muslim; the corps of the Janissaries would then conscript these Greek-in-origin youths and train them to be elite soldiers (Clogg C 1992, 14). Significantly, because of the Paidomazoma, Greeks were forced to fight alongside Turks and, most often, against fellow Christian populations.

However, the outbreak of the Greek Revolution, also known as the Greek War of Independence, did not begin until March 1821, after nearly four hundred year of atrocities, economic decline and oppression. The outbreak is celebrated on March 25th every year by tradition not because the revolution actually began that day. In the 18th and 19th century, we observe in Europe the growth of certain liberal movements, including revolutionary nationalism, Philhellenism and the Diafotismos (Διαφωτισμός), i.e. the modern Greek Enlightenment. Furthermore, in 1814, a secret organization, Philiki Etairia (Φιλική Εταιρεία), is founded. Driven by the ideas of the Enlightenment, the goal of these Greek revolutionaries was to overthrow Turkish rule.

In 1828, following seven years of violent revolts and battles, both on land and at sea, the Ottomans surrendered and were forced out of the Peloponnese and Central Greece. In May 1832, the Convention of London takes place, where Greece is finally recognized by the Great Powers (Russia, France, U.K.) as a free, independent, but monarchical, nation. The Greek Kingdom’s initial territory after the end of the revolution solely included the limited territorial gains of the war. Interestingly, Greece did not have jurisdiction over the entire geographical region it controls today until as late as 1947, that is after World War II.

Introduction of Topic & Methodology

            In a nutshell, my project consists of using primary sources in order: a) to assess to what extent the Diafotismos was an anti-imperial and anti-colonial ideology and b) to gain an in-depth understanding of how the transmission of its radical ideas contributed to the successful Greek uprising and revolution in 1821 against the Ottoman rule. These were my central initial research questions. Therefore, my intention is to take advantage of my knowledge of modern Greek and use the writings of the key intellectuals of the movement, i.e. Adamantios Korais and Rigas Pheraios, with the goal of forwarding my central argument, mainly that the Diafotismos was vital to the Greek uprising. Since there is notable overlap between the Greek Enlightenment and the Philhellenism in Western Europe, I also intend to use the writings of second-generation English Romantic poets, especially Lord Byron. The aim here is to better comprehend the Western powers’ attitude towards Greek nationalists as well as the Turkish rulers. In effect, the literary work of these intellectuals, both the philhellenes and the proponents of the Diafotismos, prepared the grounds for an uprising and influenced the outcome of the revolution. Finally, I will attempt to determine whether one can rightfully speak, in general, of a subaltern, anti-colonial Enlightenment. Secondary sources on the Philiki Etairia and its role are also implemented. Moreover, some secondary sources are used on the humanitarian intervention at the battle of Navarino to better comprehend the Western powers’ a) sympathetic attitude towards Greek nationalists and b) their problems with the Turkish rulers.

Thesis & Original Contribution

Essentially, Greece’s successful revolution was not an isolated event but more of a seven year long process. It can be attributed to numerous anti-imperial factors, both internal (e.g. Philiki Etairia, Diafotismos) and external (e.g. philhellenism, the decline of the Ottoman Empire, military and navy assistance, other European intellectual movements, complex diplomatic relations, etc.). So how important was the Diafotismos really? Would Greece have gained independence regardless? In this essay, I will argue that, as a matter of fact, the Modern Greek Enlightenment’s most important accomplishment and contribution to the War of Independence is that it served as the awakening instrument, which laid down the intellectual foundations for the Greek struggle of independence by exacerbating nationalism and by planting the seed of freedom. Beyond that, other factors led up to the ultimate success of the revolution and Greece’s recognition as an independent nation. In this light, my essay’s original contribution to the subject of Empire is the challenge to the notion of a general anti-imperial European Enlightenment movement, whereas its chief goal is to delineate the roles of philhellenism, Diafotismos and intervention within the framework of the Greek revolution. Continue reading

“Le Métèque” – Live Acoustic Reggae Cover of Georges Moustaki’s classic song , by Alpha Blondy

The Egyptian / French / Greek / Italian musician, Georges Moustaki released this in the late 1960s and is one of my personal favorites, both lyrically and musically.  The Ivory Coast artist, Alpha Blondy, did a great job covering this classic in a reggae style and tweaking it appropriately.   Watch & Share the original official music video by Moustaki, the live acoustic reggae version on TV5MONDE as well as the studio version off Alpha Blondy’s latest album, “Mystic Power”.  A song of love and suffering, the lyrics are so good, check them out below the videos!

http://tune.pk/player/embed_player.php?vid=1836351&folder=2014/01/11/&width=600&height=350&autoplay=no

Avec ma gueule de nègre métèque
De Juif errant, de rasta grec
Et mes dreadlocks aux quatre vents
Avec mes yeux tout délavés
Qui me donnent l’air de rêver
Moi qui ne rêve plus souvent
Avec mes mains de maraudeur
De musicien et de rôdeur
Qui ont pillé tant de jardins
Avec ma bouche qui a bu
Qui a embrassé et mordu
Sans jamais assouvir sa faim
Avec ma gueule de nègre métèque
De Juif errant, de rasta grec
De voleur et de vagabond
Avec ma peau qui s’est frottée
Au soleil de tous les étés
Et a tout ce qui portait jupon
Avec mon cœur qui a su faire
Souffrir autant qu’il a souffert
Sans pour cela faire d’histoires
Avec mon âme qui n’a plus
La moindre chance de salut
Pour éviter le purgatoire
Avec ma gueule de nègre métèque
De Juif errant, de rasta grec
Et mes dreadlocks aux quatre vents
Je viendrai, ma douce captive
Mon âme sœur, ma source vive
Je viendrai boire tes vingt ans
Et je serai prince de sang
Rêveur ou bien adolescent
Comme il te plaira de choisir
Et nous ferons de chaque jour
Toute une éternité d’amour
Que nous vivrons à en mourir
Et nous ferons de chaque jour
Toute une éternité d’amour
Que nous vivrons à en mourir

“Ασφάλεια” – Κακό Συναπάντημα (Unofficial Lyric Video by rootsnwingz)

Unofficial lyric video of a great song by Greek reggae band “Kako Synapantima”, on the classic “Solomon” riddim.  The lyrics are a clever and ironic commentary on city life and particularly the current tragico-comic security measures in Athens and Thessaloniki (The increased presence of police and army in the streets, discrimination, abuse of power and especially undercover informas). Video made by rootsnwingz, lyrics are in Greek and were transcribed by rootsnwingz.

Ανεπίσημο lyric video ενός άψογου και επίκαιρου κομματιού από την ελληνική reggae μπάντα ¨Κακό Συναπάντημα”.  Έξυπνοι στίχοι γεμάτοι ειρωνία και χιούμορ για την τραγική πραγματικότητα της ζωής στην πόλη. Δείτε το βίντεο για να ακούσετε το κομμάτι βλέποντας τους στίχους. Καλή Απόλαυση!


http://kako-synapantima.blogspot.gr/
https://el-gr.facebook.com/kakosynapantima
http://www.rootsnwingz.com

Top Greek Reggae Songs

Here’s a list of reggae songs by artists from Greece that I really enjoy.

1. Kako Synapantima – Tora / Κακό Συναπάντημα – Τώρα

2. Fundracar featuring Komlan from Dub Inc – Kali Kali

3. Locomondo – Ay Ay Ay ft. Amparo Sanchez

4. Sakis Boulas – Reggae kai lakerde / Σάκης Μπουλάς – Ρέγγαι και λακέρδαι

5. Locomondo – Ghetto Tourist

6. Locomondo – Athens City Nights

7. Kako Synapantima – Banania

Feel free to recommend more songs to add to the list by commenting or contacting me. 

“Jah Is My Friend” – Kenyatta Hill featuring Christos DC (Official Music Video December 2014)

Brand new official music video of Kenyatta Hill and Christos DC performing “Jah Is My Friend” off Kenyatta’s new album “Riddim Of Life”.  The legendary late Lincoln ‘Style’ Scott of Roots Radics plays the drums on this one.  ‘Style’ was the drummer on some BIG chunes, like Gregory Isaac’s “Night Nurse” and Bunny Wailer’s “Rock and Groove”.  Livicated to his memory and legacy!

Shot by Dub Africa
Edited by BOONDOX-IJAW Films

written by Kenyatta Hill & Christos DC
Produced by Christos DC for Honest Music
mixed by Kenyatta Hill for Honest Music Studios

Lead Vox: Kenyatta Hill & Christos DC
Backing Vox: Christos DC
Drums: Lincoln ‘Style’ Scott
Bass – Errol ‘Flabba’ Holt
Guitar – Dalton Browne
Additional Guitar: Christos DC
Keys – Darryl ‘D-Trane’ Burke
Trumpet – Joseph Brotherton
Percussion – Ken Joseph

Καλημέρα και Καλό Μήνα / Kalimera kai Kalo Mina

kalomina

In Greece, at the beginning of each month, we wish each other “Kalimera kai Kalo Mina!”, i.e. Good morning and Good month!  Therefore rootsnwingz would like to wish its readers, followers and visitors: “Καλημέρα και Καλό Μήνα!”

To start your month off well, why don’t you try the recipe posted today on rootsnwingz.com for a perfect, authentic Greek coffee?

Thank you for a great first month and I hope you keep on supporting rootsnwingz by sharing, liking, rating, commenting and most importantly by browsing the website for posts you enjoy!

How to Make the Perfect Authentic Traditional Greek Coffee

      greekcoffeeThings you will need:

      • One flidzáni, i.e. a demitasse or small coffee cup (60-90 mL)
      • One briki (aka ibrik, cezve), i.e. a small metal coffee pot
      • Cold water
      • High quality Greek freshly ground coffee
      • A gas stove or a portable camping gas stove
      • Sugar (optional)

brikiaDirections:

      1. Fill the flidzáni with cold water and pour the measured amount into the briki.
      2. If you want to add sugar, place briki with water over gas stove on low heat and add it now (1/4 – 1 teaspoon), stirring constantly until dissolved. Remove from heat. Skip this step if you like your coffee black.
      3. Add one heaping teaspoon of the freshly ground Greek coffee and mix until no lumps are visible, but not too much.
      4. Return to low heat on the gas stove.
      5. Heat gently until a ring of foam (known as the kaimaki) forms on the surface.
      6. Remove immediately from heat and allow to cool for a second. Place back on stove and remove immediately. Repeat this step one more time.
      7. Make sure you remove the briki from the heat before the foam ring closes completely. Pour slowly into flidzáni and serve with homemade cookies or spoon sweets (glykó tou koutalioú) and a glass of cold water.
      8. Enjoy!

Notes:

    • Do not drink the sandy coffee grounds at the bottom of your flidzáni!
    • Do not stir coffee while heating, as this will inhibit the kaimaki from forming!