rootsnwingz presents new artists: Omari Banks

omari banks
Omari Banks, born Omari Ahmed Clement Banks, is a reggae musician from Anguilla. Son of the respected reggae artist, Bankie Banx, Omari was mentored from a young boy by artists like Cat Coore, Junior Jazz, Benjy Myaz and many others. Interestingly enough, Omari is a former cricketer, a great athlete, who however recently retired in 2012 to focus on his music. Watch his new official music video, featuring Peetah Morgan of Morgan Heritage, “No point to prove”. The video was shot in Kingston, Jamaica by Big Banko Music with Keynote Records and officially released two days ago! The single is entirely written and produced by Omari Banks himself. An amazing voice and songwriter; a true international reggae artist, the future seems bright for Omari Banks.

Check out more info and music by Omari Banks at http://www.omaribanks.com

Advertisements

“Critical analysis of the concept of the witch”, original essay by rootsnwingz

What is a witch? Most people imagine witches as evil, ugly, old and dangerous women; others associate the word “witch” with magic and depictions of witches as shown in the popular media, e.g. Bewitched, Harry Potter, etc. Regardless of whether the word “witch” has a positive or negative connotation in today’s language, culture and understanding, when one examines witches and their persecution in historical perspective it becomes evident that these stereotypes are misconceptions. In reality, the witch-hunts were a very sad story of injustice and cruelty, involving the vilification and torment of countless innocent women.

The witch hunts took place over many centuries and over both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Therefore, the witch hunts were not uniform; they happened for different reasons and in different societies. Furthermore, the true nature of the witch hunts has been masked by the misinformation, biased superstition and propaganda that has been fed to the public by those groups who were in power and responsible for these massacres. In my view, this is why the word “witch” has a negative connotation in the modern English language. Calling someone a witch is rarely meant as a compliment. Consequently, I hope to demonstrate that it is not analytically sound to generalize about witches and witch hunts for that is what has led to the majority’s confusion about what these women actually were and about what really happened to them.

So were witches real? Yes, that is to say witch beliefs and practices indeed existed. However, not all the people who were killed during the witch hunts were witches. As mentioned above, most of them were innocent of the crimes they were accused of.  This brings us to the meaning of witchcraft.

Witchcraft is a kind of explanatory system –not based on science- used by society to explain natural misfortunes. In other words, witches were the scapegoats , i.e. they were blamed for undermining the world and their sacrifice was not only considered just, but also beneficial for the rest of society. Continue reading

‘Are women treated “egalitarianly” in egalitarian societies?’, an original essay by rootsnwingz

nisa

Members of an egalitarian society are, by definition, considered to be equals, i.e. they have the same status despite their diversity in terms of race, social class, income, or in this case, gender. Therefore, in principle, women in egalitarian societies have an equally important social role and responsibility as men do, or there is a general semblance of equality. In an egalitarian society, both men and women have equal influence and thus have equal opportunity to assume positions of authority. Nevertheless, although hunter-gatherer societies were more egalitarian than today’s segregated socioeconomic cultures, one may still observe differences between men and women’s roles, and even some degree of inequity.

The experiences of women in egalitarian foraging societies as described by Marjorie Shostak in her book, “Nisa, the life and words of a !Kung woman”, testify to a higher degree of gender equality in bushman societies than in non-egalitarian modern ones. However, they also shed some light into why men still managed to assume greater authority in some instances and why their contribution was often valued more than women’s. In spite of these slight gender differences, the author argues that foraging societies were a lot less stratified than today’s market-based societies, where gender hierarchies are prevalent. In other words, she suggests that:

Perhaps the extremes of subordination of women by men found in many of today’s more socioeconomically ‘advanced’ cultures are only a relatively recent aberration in our long, human calendar.” (Shostak 2000, 214)

In my view, the emergence of gender hierarchies is directly related to the shift from hunting and gathering towards a settler’s life and the development of market economies. Continue reading

“Cannabis: Mesopotamia & Egypt”, essay by Conner North

mesopotamia1
Published by the online magazine INITY, this essay explains how ancient hieroglyphics record the medicinal use of cannabis by ancient civilizations. The well written article presents some very informative and important evidence. Here’s an interesting excerpt:

Mesopotamia (3000 BC) & Egypt (2000 BC)

Trickling from ancient China, cannabis made its way to Mesopotamia and Egypt, and only recently, in the 19th and 20th Centuries, has ancient hieroglyphics been deciphered along with cannabis’ medicinal use. As with the ancient Chinese, Mesopotamians and Egyptians overstood and embraced the significance of natural remedies, including cannabis, and were in harmony with their environment and the cosmos.

Our knowledge of ancient medicine is derived almost exclusively from the great library of clay tablets gathered throughout history. Roughly 30,000 fragments of ancient Mesopotamian and Egyptian clay tablets exist, which may have well numbered over 100,000 when complete.


papyrus
Throughout Mesopotamian tablets and Egyptian scrolls, similar references are made to the medicinal use of cannabis as a remedy for:

Acute pain
Fever
Trench foot/gout/sore feet
Inflammation
Gynecological disorders
Colorectal illness
Serosity
Bacteria

It’s interesting to note some of the ancient medicinal uses of cannabis are the same as today’s conditions that enable eligibility to get a red card (in Colorado and some other states) and become a legal MMJ patient, like acute, or chronic, pain.

While medical technology and philosophy has evolved leaps and bounds and epic discoveries have been made, as we technologically advance, it’s hard to ignore the detachment from the environment and nature that comes with these advancements. Granted, we shouldn’t be heading back to the Stone Age anytime soon, medically speaking, but in retrospect and in comparison to ancients, we have lost touch with naturalness. Plants and other natural elements were used by ancients to combat medical issues that we still face today.

For the full article go to: http://inityweekly.com/mmj-mesopotamia-egypt/

To view an original Assyrian tablet with a translation listing cannabis as a natural remedy for treating bruises and swelling click here: http://antiquecannabisbook.com/chap2B/Assyria/K6261.htm

“I don’t fight for inspiration. The riddim brings inspiration. If the riddim is militant and heavy, you have to fight this battle called life. I meditate and go inside. I don’t sing a melody in front of everyone. The music is already there. I make everything from scratch. It’s not just singing a song. The bottom line is sincerity. I do it for myself. It’s about word, sound and power. It’s always about word and sound. These things come together in music.” – Vaughn Benjamin, singer of the reggae band Midnite .

vaughn

“Can Jamaica still claim reggae music as its own? “, opinion article by Shereita Grizzle from the Jamaica Gleaner

midnite2

Excerpt:
Midnite and I-Grade Records have built upon the foundation of roots reggae a truly authentic and more evolved sound that is all their own. They are an absolute original and their music is on a much higher level intellectually than reggae. Dermot Hussey explained in ‘Midnite In The Belly of The Beast’ “I think lyrically they have changed the form of the reggae song. Intellectually they are way in advance of the mostly simple messages of traditional reggae.” They are also the most prolific band in reggae and have been for at least the past 15 years.

So no, Jamaica can no longer claim reggae music as its own. I agree with Professor Carolyn Cooper who says “[s]o we’ve given reggae music to the world. But sometimes we act as if reggae was stolen from us.” Jamaica should stand proud for they gave the world a very soulful and spiritual music which continues to touch the lives of people all over the world. But reggae music now belongs to those who choose to be caretakers of the music, wherever they are.

Read full article, by clicking on the link below:

Can Jamaica still claim reggae music as its own?.

To read the full researched historical account of the band Midnite, entitled ‘Midnite In The Belly of The Beast’, visit: http://inityweekly.com/midnite-in-the-garden-of-good-and-evil-part-1/ and http://inityweekly.com/midnite-in-the-garden-of-good-and-evil-part-2/

Just Blaze plays DJ set with Sushi – Sushi Sequencer

I just read about this and found it rather funny and creative, definitely smart and original. Apparently, an experimental sound system has been developed that can detect colored sushi plates and play a specific sound. Hip hop producer Just Blaze tried the innovative system out and actually made an awesome groundbreaking sushi-fueled DJ set for some Japanese locals at a revolutionary Sushi-go-round in Japan. You’re sure to laugh but the mix he creates is impressive to say the least. Watch the video here.

Source: http://www.redbullmusicacademy.com/

House of Riddim meets L.U.S.T – Mama Africa (New November 2014)

l.u.s.t
Austrian roots reggae producers House of Riddim present “Mama Africa”, by L.U.S.T, the reggae group composed by legendary Jamaican singers Singing Melody, Lukie D, Thriller U, and Tony Curtis. Sweet and positive vibes with a serious contemporary and relevant message, this is a powerful piece delivered excellently by L.U.S.T and their beautiful vocals. The song is a warning to all people to stop ignoring the poverty, corruption, disease and injustice in Africa today and a cry for unity, equal rights, justice and peace. Listen here for free:

“Sink or Swim” – Bo Napoleon featuring Tenelle (Official Lyrics Video)

Native Hawaiian Bo Napoleon teamed up in 2012 with Tenelle to create this moving love duet. Reggae and Hawaiian music influences, two great passionate voices and a positive, powerful message. Anyone who’s ever been in love will greatly appreciate and relate. “Love is either sink or swim”… Check it out here:

Written by Bo Napoleon
Produced by Chazrox via Gee’rage Music

rootsnwingz presents new artists: Eli-Mac

eli-mac
Hawaiian Filipino singer Eli-Mac, aka Ciara-Camile Roque Velasco, released her debut reggae album “DubStop EP” last month. All five tracks are great thanks to Eli-Mac’s singular voice and the top-notch production by Live Animaux (J Boog, The Green, etc). I love her work so far and look forward to see what this artist has in store for us in the future!

Watch the awesome explicit official music video of “Dub Stop”, the first single off the EP:

Also, here’s her amazing collaboration with Japanese reggae singer, song writer, producer, club DJ and owner of an independent music label, Likkle Mai. Also off Eli-Mac’s new album, the track is entitled “Young Soul Rebels” and is a truly original dub reggae tune. A big tune all around, two unique female voices, a positive, uplifting message and some real heavy dub sounds from producers. I listen to this one on repeat. “Keep the keiki (meaning youth in Hawaiian) strong!”

Finally, here’s one of Eli-Mac’s first singles, “Guava Jelly”, a cover of Bob Marley’s hit. Produced in Jamaica by Stephen Marley, who also does some toasting on the track!

Check out more videos and tunes by Eli-Mac on her official YouTube page https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtCPemfdVe6KYE2lMcZ0-Dg.

“Herbivore” – Leilani Wolfgramm (Official Lyric Video)

WE SHOULD SMOKE! Dope lyrics by the beautiful Leilani, check out the official lyric video here:

Full lyrics:

Herbivore
I be smoking nature’s cure
I can’t get enough
Filling up my lung lung lungs with the earth
Herbivore

You call me the herbivore
Fiya fi make them crystals work
I just fell in love
Digging up that green green bud from the dirt
Herbivore

I want someone with a deep deep lung
I want someone with a green green thumb
I want someone with a wiggle in his tongue
He say roll it in a blunt
He say put it in a bong

And if you love me, let your love burn strong
And if you love me, love me all night long
And if you love me, let your love burn slow
If you don’t love the ganja, best leave I alone
Continue reading

rootsnwingz presents new artists: Leilani Wolfgramm

leilani2

Leilani Wolfgramm is a singer, songwriter, and guitarist with Tongan roots from Orlando, Florida. Three years ago she started playing along side her brothers, Zech and Nasur in their reggae band, Hor!zen. After a year she set out on a solo career releasing an EP entitled, “I Burn.” Leilani has toured with Fortunate Youth and the Supervillians and has shared the stage with acts such as Ballyhoo, Dirty Heads, Tribal Seeds, Sublime ft. Rome, New Kingston and The Movement. In 2014 she collaborated with producer and artist, E.N Young, known for his work with Tribal Seeds, on her new reggae album, “Rebel”, that dropped in the Summer of 2014.

http://www.leilaniwolfgrammmusic.com/
http://instagram.com/leilaniwolfgramm
https://www.facebook.com/Leilaniwolfgramm

Full of natural charisma and talent, Leilani is bound to grab people’s attention with her beautiful voice, conscious lyrics and her own original music.  Check out her new album on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/rebel/id901713554

Watch the official video of one of my favourite tracks off  the “Rebel” album, entitled “Herbivore”, below:

Here’s a few more, cause I know you won’t be able to get enough of the stunning Leilani:

Gentleman ft. Marlon Roudette – “Big City Life” (MTV Unplugged)

German reggae singer Gentleman and British / Vincentian Marlon Roudette of Mattafix sing the 2005 hit song “Big City Life” by Mattafix on MTV Unplugged. Amazing version of a timeless song performed by a full string and wind instrument orchestra, featuring the legendary Dean Fraser on the sax. A big collaboration!

Check it out here:

Joseph Hill, Culture interview, West Indian World Newspaper, 1982

Yesterday I wrote a bit on Joseph “Culture” Hill and his son Kenyatta. Here’s an awesome, rare interview with Joseph Hill in 1982 I just found on the midnightraver blog!

Midnight Raver

Give thanks to MIDNIGHT RAVER’S Peter van Arnhem for this most crucial contribution.

The article finds Joseph Hill in London in September 1982. Joseph talks about the split in the group, about the death of Bob Marley, about the song “Tribute to the O.M.” (album Lion Rock) and about Rasta.

After the album Lion Rock 4 years went by before Joseph Hill reunited with original members Kenneth Dayes and Albert Walker and recorded the album Çulture in Culture.

culture article

View original post

Christos DC – Ο νέος Ελληνοαμερικάνος Reggae μουσικός !

Ο Ελληνοαμερικάνος μουσικός Christos DC, γεννημένος Christopher Vrenios (ΧΡΙΣΤΟΦΟΡΟΣ ΒΡΕΝΙΟΣ), γεννήθηκε και μεγάλωσε στην Ουάσινγκτον, Π.Κ. με γονείς που τραγουδούσαν όπερα και που δίδασκαν φωνητική επαγγελματικά. Το καλλιτενικό του όνομα, Christos DC, προέρχεται από το ψευδώνυμο που του έδωσε η γιαγιά του, αλλά επίσης αντιπροσωπεύει τη γεννέτηρα πόλη του, όπου ξεκίνησε το μουσικό του ταξίδι.

Ο ήχος του μπορεί να περιγραφθεί ως ένας πετυχημένος συνδυασμός Downtempo και Reggae μουσικής με επιρροές από τη Jazz. Η καριέρα του ξεκίνησε στις αρχές της δεκαετίας του 1990 παράγωντας κομμάτια hip hop και r&b με ανεξάρτητους καλλιτέχνες από τη Ουάσινγτον και τη Νέα Υόρκη. Η αγάπη του και εκτίμηση για τη μουσική του Κίνγκστον, Τζαμάικα, τον οδήγησαν να ηχογραφήσει κομμάτια με τους θρυλικούς μουσικούς και παραγωγούς, Sly και Robbie, αλλά και με το Firehouse Crew.

Έπειτα έκανε περιοδεία με τον καταπληκτικό τραγουδιστή Don Carlos, της μπάντας Black Uhuru, και τους The Itals. Πέρασε εφτά χρόνια στο δρόμο, ταξιδεύοντας ως κιθαρίστας και τραγουδιστής παίζοντας στις ΗΠΑ και άλλες χώρες. Σ’αυτό το διάστημα, παρήγαγε και ηχογράφησε ένα δίσκο με τον τίτλο Offering, στον οποίο συμμετείχαν διάφοροι γνωστοί μουσικοί από τη Τζαμάικα, όπως ο Sugar Minott, οι Meditations και ο Don Carlos, τραγουδώντας πάνω από τη μουσική του. Ο δίσκος επίσης περιείχε το πρώτο του solo κομμάτι. Ο δίσκος ηχογραφήθηκε κυρίως στη Τζαμάικα με τον αείμνηστο Augustus Pablo, καθώς και άλλους σπουδαίους μουσικούς του νησιού.

Συνέχισε με διάφορες δουλειές ως κιθαρίστας, μπασίστας και συνθέτης (Έχει συνθέσει κομμάτια μαζί με τους παγκόσμια γνωστούς παραγωγούς Thievery Corporation, αλλά και άλλα σχήματα). Το 2008, κυκλοφόρησε το πρώτο του άλμπουμ, Time to Rise, το οποίο τον οδήγησε στην ίδρυση της ανεξάρτητης δισκογραφικής εταιρείας, Honest Music. Ο επόμενος του δίσκος, Under the Sun, κυκλοφόρησε φυσικά από την Honest Music.

Το νέο album λέγεται Long Road και είναι ήδη μεγάλη επιτυχία στην Αμερική και τη Reggae σκηνή γενικότερα.

“Η μουσική είναι ένα δώρο,” λέει ο Χρήστος. “Όταν τη μοιραζόμαστε, πρέπει να λογαριάζουμε το πως θα επηρεάσει τους άλλους. Γι’ αυτό φτιάχνω ειλικρινή μουσική”.

Η μετάφραση στα ελληνικά και η επιμέλεια έγινε από rootsnwingz.
Πηγή: http://www.christosdc.com/about

Edited and translated from http://www.christosdc.com/about into Greek by rootsnwingz.

Christos DC featuring Kenyatta Hill – “Talk to Me” (Official Music Video 2014)

The Washington D.C. based Greek American Christos DC, aka Christopher Vrenios, and Jamaican Kenyatta Hill, son of legendary singer Joseph Hill of the reggae group Culture, present the first single and music video off Christo’s new 2014 album, “Long Road”. Christos DC is an up-and-coming reggae artist and CEO at Honest Music; a multi-instrumentalist with a beautiful voice. The message is simple and very relevant considering today’s smartphone and social media obsession: we have to talk more to each other. Great music and lyrics by both artists, much respect to the Greek and African diaspora for keeping it real!

“…born and raised in Washington, D.C. by parents who sang opera and taught voice professionally. He takes his name from his Greek heritage using a nickname given to him by his grandmother & also to represent his birthplace that set the tone of his musical journey.
His sound is best described as a blend of Downtempo, Reggae with overtones of jazz”.
Read Christos DC’s impressive bio here: http://www.christosdc.com/about

Honest Music Productions. Cinematics by ViZionCreative.

http://www.christosdc.com